EEI's electrical services team provides its clients with high-level testing and engineering services to ensure the safety of, and to provide quality assurance for, the construction, operation and integration of mission critical systems. Our team is dedicated to providing clients with seamless integration of their electrical systems and related equipment in order to ensure reliable and maximized performance, particularly in critical environments.  As electrical systems and equipment become more sophisticated and complex, the risk of installation errors, misapplication or failure becomes greater; these are all areas covered by EEI during commissioning or system analysis.  The following are some of the major electrical services that EEI frequently offers to clients throughout the nation: 


Infrared Thermography
Infrared Thermography is a testing method that detects infrared energy as it is emitted from a surveyed object and converts it to a temperature reading. The use of our calibrated infrared camera will help, in part, to give our experienced engineers the ability to determine if an anomaly exists. This testing is non-destructive and can be done without interruption to power; a useful tool in a working building.  

 

 

 

High Speed Power Quality Metering

High Speed Power Quality Metering is a testing method used to determine if the power received by critical equipment meets the tested equipment’s performance data, will support the load during different operational and failure modes, and does not have any destructive influences that could potentially destroy sensitive equipment. These destructive influences can be caused by harmonic distortion, phase imbalances, power spikes and frequency deviations.

 

 

 

Electrical Testing and Maintenance

Electrical Testing and Maintenance are extremely valuable electrical services that maintain the health of your facility, or prove that new construction equipment components are functioning and performing as intended/designed.  Our testing and maintenance of low- or medium-voltage systems are performed in accordance with the highest standards (ANSI/NETA), but we prefer to propose to you the exact testing and maintenance you really need. 

 

Arc Flash Analysis, Calculation and Safety
With the U.S. electrical grid becoming more robust and existing equipment often being rated for lower levels of energy, Arc Flash is a serious issue.  Due to the nature and intensity of Arc Flash incidents the likelihood of injury or equipment damage cannot be understated. EEI is able to analyze a system, calculate the energy available for an Arc Flash event, provide breaker settings to protect the electrical equipment and provide NFPA 70E required labeling for the safety of personnel tasked with operating, maintaining or repairing the equipment. Code outlined methods of estimating the hazards inherent to an electrical system are available, but a full calculation utilizing the latest software is necessary to identify the exact nature of the hazard.

Value Added Services

Data Center Services In addition to all the services noted above, EEI Electrical Services team is able to provide the following value-added engineering services as appropriate on a project-to-project basis:

Method of Procedure Development/Execution: We develop the documentation needed for change control management to be followed step-by-step to accomplish critical tasks while ensuring business continuity.

Business Continuity / Risk Analysis: EEI Electrical Services helps evaluate the risks of "doing" vs. "not doing", and we give you all the information needed to make an informed decision.

Temporary System Design, Construction & Operation: To keep your business up-and-running, we will design, construct and operate a newly-derived temporary system to keep your business running during major activities. We focus on "no-interruptions"!

Equipment Load Banking: We provide load banks to simulate your operating load or equipment capacity level of load. 

 

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT JIM GIBSON: 303.239.8700 / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
 

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